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Tag Archives: porcine tissue

Porcine Tissue Teaches Researchers About Human Hearts

porcine tissueIt is important to determine the mechanical behavior of vessels and other soft tissues in order to know how they properly handle loads in all directions (circumferential and longitudinal).

Post-mortem porcine tissue is an excellent model to use in order to test and determine these values.  Researchers are gaining valuable information every day from using porcine tissues which will aid them in being able to repair soft tissues that rupture within humans or animals alike, because they understand how the tissues function under pressure.

A recent study at Aix-Marseille Universite in France – published earlier this month in the Journal of Biomechanics – looked at the mechanical behavior of the porcine ascending aorta as it relates to human ascending aorta pathologies.

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What Porcine Tissue Tells Us About Heart Disease

post mortem porcine tissueHeart disease is a leading cause of death in the US today and patients that survive a myocardial infarction have a low five year survival rate. Therefore there is a great need for regenerative approaches for stimulating repair.

Gene electro transfer (GET) to the left ventricular myocardium is a promising technique for delivery of therapeutic genes for the treatment of ischemia, myocardial infarction and heart failure directly to the effected myocardium. In this study a small animal model (rat) and a large animal model (porcine) were used for gene delivery to non-ischemic and ischemic left ventricular myocardium.

Gene expression was evaluated histologically for location of expression within the myocardium as well as quantitatively via ELISA.  These animal models allow for the evaluation of therapeutic potential of particular gene delivery as well as translation to clinical settings.

— From Gene Electro Transfer to Left Ventricular Myocardium in Rat and Porcine Models by A.A. Bulysheva, B. Hargrave, N. Burcus, C.G. Lundberg, L. Murray, and R. Heller.

Past studies have shown post mortem porcine tissue effective in studying bone regeneration and other human health issues.

Animal Biotech is proud to be a part of this kind of work. For over 25 years, we have helped the biomedical research community by supplying it with live high quality research porcine models as well as high quality post mortem porcine tissues, organs, and glands. Animal Biotech also supplies information, consultation and training on husbandry, testing, housing and uses of live animals. Contact us today to learn more about how we can assist you in your work.

Bone Regeneration Study Uses Porcine Tissue

porcine tissue researchOsteoporotic patients, incapacitated due to vertebral compression fractures (VCF), suffer grave financial and clinical burdens because current clinical treatments focus on symptoms’ management but do not combat the issue at the source.

In this pilot study, allogeneic porcine mesenchymal stem cells, (over expressing the BMP6 gene) were suspended in fibrin gel and implanted into a vertebral defect to investigate their effect on bone regeneration in a clinically relevant, large animal pig model. Bone healing was evaluated in vivo at 6 and 12 weeks and ex vivo at 6 months.

Both exams showed significant bone regeneration within 6 weeks of implantation in the BMP gene group while only minor bone formation was seen in the defect site of the control group. This preclinical study presents an innovative, potentially minimally invasive technique that can be used to induce bone regeneration using allogeneic gene modified MSCs and therefore revolutionize current treatment for challenging conditions such as osteoporosis-related VCFs.

From BMP6-Engineered MSCs Induced Vertebral Bone Repair in Pig Model: A Pilot Study by Gadi Pelled, Dmitriy Sheyn, Wafa Tawackoli, Deuk Soo Jun, Youngdo Koh, Susan Su, Doron Cohn Yakubovich, Ilan Kallai, Ben Antebi, Xiaoyu Da, Zulma Gazit, Hyun Bae and Dan Gazit

Past studies have shown porcine tissue effective in repairing rotator cuffs in human patients, and to regrow muscle tissue.

Animal Biotech is proud to provide support for this sort of scientific work. For over 25 years, we have helped the biomedical research community by supplying it with live high quality research porcine models as well as high quality post mortem tissues, organs, and glands. We also supply information, consultation and training on most aspects of husbandry, testing, housing and uses of live animals. Contact us today to learn more about how we can assist you in your work.

New Pig Model Will Provide Cancer Treatment and Detection Insights

pig modelIt is important to identify cancer as early as possible in order to effectively combat its effects on the host.

The University of Illinois has been working for many years on early detection screening methods for cancer in order to help treat cancer patients with very aggressive types of cancer.  It is critical to catch and treat all cancers in the earliest stage possible but this is especially critical concerning cancers such as pancreatic, hepatic and lung.  The University found that the pig was the better model to help develop these screening tests because they are so anatomically similar to humans.

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Porcine Tissue Can Help Study Marfan Syndrome

porcine tissuePorcine post mortem tissues could be used to augment ATAA (ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm) studies in human normal and Marfan syndrome patients, according to research at the University of Western Ontario’s Department of Medical Biophysics.

In this study the human tissues had to be retrieved from human patients undergoing invasive bypass surgeries as well as from human cadavers. Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects the body’s connective tissue, and can cause issues with a person’s heart, blood vessels, bones, joints, and eyes.

Because of the anatomical and physiological similarities of porcine to human aortic arteries, post mortem porcine tissue could be substituted experimentally for human tissue thus greatly reducing the time and expense of the research studies.

In the past, porcine tissue has also been used to repair rotator cuffs in human patients, and to regrow muscle tissue.

For over 25 years, Animal Biotech has helped the biomedical community with this sort of research by supplying it with live high quality research porcine models along with high quality post mortem tissues, organs, and glands. We also provide information, consultation and training on most aspects of husbandry, testing, housing and uses of live animals. Contact us today to learn more about how we can assist you in your work.

 

How Domestic Pigs Can Help Cure Human Ailments

porcine tissueThe purpose of animal research is to derive scientific information from animal models that will be used to benefit human health and wellness.

The domestic pig (Sus scrofa) is one of the most valuable animal models used in biomedical research today,  both as a live animal and also as a source of post mortem tissues. This is because of its lower cost, larger size and anatomical, biological and physiological similarity to humans.

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Research Swine Production Will Benefit From Vaccines Being Developed Against PEDv

In June of this year the USDA set aside $3.9 million for two licensed animal vaccine companies to develop vaccines for PEDv. To date that money has not made it to them.  The two companies, Zoetis and Harrisvaccines, however have developed vaccines and are currently field testing them.

Both are testing vaccine administered to research swine sows of infected herds for the purpose of developing passive immunity through milk colostrum for their piglets. The Zoetis vaccine went on the market in September and the company is collecting efficacy and potency data.  The Harrisvaccine, likewise, is being tested on select farms as well. Preliminary data from both companies looks promising as the litters from vaccinated sows are showing low death losses and minimal diarrhea as compared to control groups.

Please click to read the The New York Times article: Farmers Gain Weapon Against Devastating Pig Virus by Stephanie Strom. Oct. 9, 2014