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Category Archives: Porcine tissue research

Porcine Tissue Teaches Researchers About Human Hearts

porcine tissueIt is important to determine the mechanical behavior of vessels and other soft tissues in order to know how they properly handle loads in all directions (circumferential and longitudinal).

Post-mortem porcine tissue is an excellent model to use in order to test and determine these values.  Researchers are gaining valuable information every day from using porcine tissues which will aid them in being able to repair soft tissues that rupture within humans or animals alike, because they understand how the tissues function under pressure.

A recent study at Aix-Marseille Universite in France – published earlier this month in the Journal of Biomechanics – looked at the mechanical behavior of the porcine ascending aorta as it relates to human ascending aorta pathologies.

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Why Porcine Tissues Are Key For Researchers

porcine tissues used for researchPigs are increasingly being used as an alternative to animals like dogs and monkeys when it comes to surgical procedures and preclinical toxicology testing of pharmaceuticals.

That’s according to research published in the journal Veterinary Pathology.

“There are unique advantages to the use of swine in this setting given that they share with humans similar anatomic and physiologic characteristics involving the cardiovascular, urinary, integumentary, and digestive systems,” the authors write in the article “Swine as Models in Biomedical Research and Toxicology Testing.”

They continue:

“Ethical considerations, as well as the existence of significant amounts of background data, from a regulatory perspective, provide further support for the use of this species in experimental or pharmaceutical research studies. It is likely that pigs and minipigs will become an increasingly important animal model for research and pharmaceutical development applications.”

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The Importance of Porcine Tissues in Research

porcine tissuesThe creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again: but already it was impossible to say which was which.”

That’s George Orwell in Animal Farm, making a political, allegorical, point. But he also could have been talking about biology.

Humans and pigs share a lot of similarities when it comes to anatomy and physiology. Pigs’ organ systems are 80-90 percent similar to those of humans, veterinary researcher Dr. Michael Swindle told FOX News in 2014.

“They are what’s known as a translational research model, so if [something] works in the pig, then it has a high possibility of working in a human,” Swindle said.

That’s why the news last year that researchers had eliminated PERVs – which stands for porcine endogenous retroviruses – in some pig kidney cell DNA was so important.

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New Hope for Transplanting Pig Organs to People

porcine cadaverThere are more than 123,000 Americans waiting for the organ transplants that can save their lives.

And while pigs’ organs are close to humans’ in terms of anatomy and physiology, medicine hasn’t yet reached the point where pig-to-human organ transplants are a viable option.

But new gene-editing research shows we may be closer to using animals as human organ donors. The study – published late last year in Science – focused on a new gene editing technique that removed some of the roadblocks to pig-to-human organ transplants.

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Study Shows Porcine Cells Can Help Wound Healing

An acellular cholecyst extracellular matrix (p-CEM) of porcine origin was prepared using iStock_000002065074_Smallanionic biological detergent and the healing potential compared with commercially available collagen sheet (b-CS) and open wound (C) in full-thickness skin wounds in rats.

Healing was evaluated on the basis of wound contraction, gross, hematological, immunological and histopathological observations. It was found that p-CEM had healing potential and was shown to have a better healing response than commercially available collagen sheet to reconstruct full thickness skin wounds in rats.

This study illustrates the better healing qualities of porcine extracellular matrix when compared to commercially available collagen sheets and open wound in full-thickness skin wounds in rats.

— From Porcine cholecyst derived extracellular matrix (p-CEM) for reconstruction of full thickness skin wounds in rats. Poonam Shakya et al. Wound Medicine, Vol 10-11, December 2015, Pages 23-31. Copyright 2015 Elsevier B.V.

This research is just the latest study using porcine materials to advance medical treatment. Past studies have used pig models to look at repair to damaged hearts and genome reprogramming.

At Animal Biotech, we’re proud to be a part of this kind of work. For more than 20 years, we have supplied the biomedical research community with live porcine models and post-mortem tissues, along with expert consultation and information. Contact us today to find out how we can assist you in your work.

What Porcine Tissue Tells Us About Heart Disease

post mortem porcine tissueHeart disease is a leading cause of death in the US today and patients that survive a myocardial infarction have a low five year survival rate. Therefore there is a great need for regenerative approaches for stimulating repair.

Gene electro transfer (GET) to the left ventricular myocardium is a promising technique for delivery of therapeutic genes for the treatment of ischemia, myocardial infarction and heart failure directly to the effected myocardium. In this study a small animal model (rat) and a large animal model (porcine) were used for gene delivery to non-ischemic and ischemic left ventricular myocardium.

Gene expression was evaluated histologically for location of expression within the myocardium as well as quantitatively via ELISA.  These animal models allow for the evaluation of therapeutic potential of particular gene delivery as well as translation to clinical settings.

— From Gene Electro Transfer to Left Ventricular Myocardium in Rat and Porcine Models by A.A. Bulysheva, B. Hargrave, N. Burcus, C.G. Lundberg, L. Murray, and R. Heller.

Past studies have shown post mortem porcine tissue effective in studying bone regeneration and other human health issues.

Animal Biotech is proud to be a part of this kind of work. For over 25 years, we have helped the biomedical research community by supplying it with live high quality research porcine models as well as high quality post mortem porcine tissues, organs, and glands. Animal Biotech also supplies information, consultation and training on husbandry, testing, housing and uses of live animals. Contact us today to learn more about how we can assist you in your work.

Can Rats and Pigs Help Mend Damaged Hearts?

Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the US today and patients that survive a iStock_000003693823_Smallmyocardial infarction have a low five year survival rate. Therefore there is a great need for regenerative approaches for stimulating repair.

Gene electro transfer (GET) to the left ventricular myocardium is a promising technique for delivery of therapeutic genes for the treatment of ischemia, myocardial infarction and heart failure directly to the effected myocardium. In this study a small animal model (rat) and a porcine model were used for gene delivery to non-ischemic and ischemic left ventricular myocardium.

Gene expression was evaluated histologically for location of expression within the myocardium as well as quantitatively via ELISA.  These animal models allow for the evaluation of therapeutic potential of particular gene delivery as well as translation to clinical settings.

— From Gene Electro Transfer to Left Ventricular Myocardium in Rat and Porcine Models by A.A. Bulysheva, B. Hargrave, N. Burcus, C.G. Lundberg, L. Murray, and R. Heller

 Past studies using pig models have given researchers new insights into cancer treatment and detection.

At Animal Biotech, we’re proud to be a part of this kind of work. For more than two decades, we have worked with the biomedical research community by supplying it with live porcine models and post-mortem tissues, as well as information and consultation. Contact us today to find out how we can assist you in your work.

 

What Porcine Enzymes and Mice Tell Us About Blood Brain Barrier Dysfunction

iStock_000012327217_SmallChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) shows progressive, irreversible airflow limitation induced by emphysema and lung inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine if COPD conditions induce blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction.

They found that intratracheal administration of porcine pancreatic elastase induced alveolar enlargement, increased neutrophil numbers in bronchoalveolar fluid and decreased blood oxygen saturation in mice at 21 days post inhalation. At the same time BBB permeability to sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin was markedly increased concluding that COPD conditions are associated with risk for BBB impairment.

— From Elevated permeability of the blood-brain barrier in mice intratracheally administered porcine pancreatic elastase by Fuyuko Takata, Koji Tominaga, Mitsuhisa Koga, Shinya Dohgu, Koujiro Futagami, Atsushi Yamauchi, Yasufumi Kataoka

This study shows one of the many ways porcine models can aid in human health breakthroughs. In the past, researchers have used porcine  tissue to repair human tendons.

Bone Regeneration Study Uses Porcine Tissue

porcine tissue researchOsteoporotic patients, incapacitated due to vertebral compression fractures (VCF), suffer grave financial and clinical burdens because current clinical treatments focus on symptoms’ management but do not combat the issue at the source.

In this pilot study, allogeneic porcine mesenchymal stem cells, (over expressing the BMP6 gene) were suspended in fibrin gel and implanted into a vertebral defect to investigate their effect on bone regeneration in a clinically relevant, large animal pig model. Bone healing was evaluated in vivo at 6 and 12 weeks and ex vivo at 6 months.

Both exams showed significant bone regeneration within 6 weeks of implantation in the BMP gene group while only minor bone formation was seen in the defect site of the control group. This preclinical study presents an innovative, potentially minimally invasive technique that can be used to induce bone regeneration using allogeneic gene modified MSCs and therefore revolutionize current treatment for challenging conditions such as osteoporosis-related VCFs.

From BMP6-Engineered MSCs Induced Vertebral Bone Repair in Pig Model: A Pilot Study by Gadi Pelled, Dmitriy Sheyn, Wafa Tawackoli, Deuk Soo Jun, Youngdo Koh, Susan Su, Doron Cohn Yakubovich, Ilan Kallai, Ben Antebi, Xiaoyu Da, Zulma Gazit, Hyun Bae and Dan Gazit

Past studies have shown porcine tissue effective in repairing rotator cuffs in human patients, and to regrow muscle tissue.

Animal Biotech is proud to provide support for this sort of scientific work. For over 25 years, we have helped the biomedical research community by supplying it with live high quality research porcine models as well as high quality post mortem tissues, organs, and glands. We also supply information, consultation and training on most aspects of husbandry, testing, housing and uses of live animals. Contact us today to learn more about how we can assist you in your work.

Porcine Tissue Can Help Study Marfan Syndrome

porcine tissuePorcine post mortem tissues could be used to augment ATAA (ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm) studies in human normal and Marfan syndrome patients, according to research at the University of Western Ontario’s Department of Medical Biophysics.

In this study the human tissues had to be retrieved from human patients undergoing invasive bypass surgeries as well as from human cadavers. Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects the body’s connective tissue, and can cause issues with a person’s heart, blood vessels, bones, joints, and eyes.

Because of the anatomical and physiological similarities of porcine to human aortic arteries, post mortem porcine tissue could be substituted experimentally for human tissue thus greatly reducing the time and expense of the research studies.

In the past, porcine tissue has also been used to repair rotator cuffs in human patients, and to regrow muscle tissue.

For over 25 years, Animal Biotech has helped the biomedical community with this sort of research by supplying it with live high quality research porcine models along with high quality post mortem tissues, organs, and glands. We also provide information, consultation and training on most aspects of husbandry, testing, housing and uses of live animals. Contact us today to learn more about how we can assist you in your work.