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Category Archives: Porcine Models

How Porcine Cells Contribute to Restorative Therapies

porcine cells

Research swine are contributing to research studies that focus on restorative therapies to replace lost or diseased human tissues.

While the amount of suitable human cells for transplantation is lacking, porcine cells offer researchers a suitable, and much more available, alternative.

In 2014, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh found that cells derived from porcine organs – in this case, bladders – could work with human stem cells help build muscles in the legs of five men who had suffered severe injuries, including two soldiers injured by IEDs.

All five had suffered from nearly 60 percent to 90 percent of leg muscle loss, and had undergone surgery and physical therapy, with no success.

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How Porcine Islet Cells Could Help Treat Diabetes

porcine islet cells

Research swine are playing a substantial role in uncovering new methods of treating diabetes.

Porcine islet cells are an integral part of the microislet cell encapsulation method because there is an unlimited source of porcine pancreas cells as compared to human donor pancreatic islets.

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Pig Lumbar Spines Used for Pedicle Screw Testing

Pedicle ScrewsPedicle screws have been the standard method of treatment of spinal diseases.

However, these screws can loosen over time after placement during surgery, which makes them a less-than-ideal choice.

But how can surgeons improve on this practice? The answer may lie within research swine. More specifically, within pig lumbar spines.

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Determining the Presence of Brown Adipose Tissue in Porcine Models

adipose cell on microscopeIf there’s one thread that runs through all our blog posts, it’s the physiological similarity between pigs and humans, a fact that makes the porcine model extremely useful in biomedical research.

For example, there’s the study conducted by researchers at South China Agricultural University and the University of Hawaii at Manoa that looked for the presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in pigs.

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Porcine Model Used for Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Research

Endoscopy Capsule Research using Porcine TissueWireless capsule endoscopy has been very helpful in making advances in the world of endoscopy, but this work has always been limited to superficial tissue.

However, a there is a new method of pairing ultrasonography with the wireless capsule, allowing doctors to view deeper levels of tissue and therefore have a clearer view of all the tissues involved in the endoscopic procedure.

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Porcine Model Used for Acute Lung Injury Research

porcine model for lung researchThe porcine model has proved to be helpful in establishing the therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in reducing the inflammatory response during acute lung injuries.

In a study conducted at the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, researchers determined that pigs induced with severe traumatic lung injuries had decreased PVR/SVR levels two hours after treatment with MSCs.

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Porcine Models Used to Study Radiosurgical Ablation of the Renal Nerve

porcine cadaverAbout 75 million Americans have hypertension, a condition that can lead to stroke, heart failure, kidney disease and elevated risk for heart attack.

Treating this condition can be frustrating. Only about half of all people with hypertension have the disease under control.

New research published earlier this year in the journal Cureus looked at the efficacy of treating refractory hypertension through radiosurgical ablation of the renal nerve.

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Cryogels for Wound Care Applications in Porcine Models

Pigs.As we’ve pointed out in previous blog posts, porcine models are helpful in the study of human wound healing, because pigs and humans have very similar skin.

Porcine models played a role in a recent study at the University of Reading in Great Britain that looked at the use of cryogels and hydrogels in wound care applications.

Hydrogels are well known for their ability to aid in wound healing by accelerating the healing process such as reducing the amount of dehydration in the wound bed and absorbing exudate.

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